The problem with opensource components

construction

While opensource components are basically indispensable in modern software development, they also must be handled with care. In this post, I will explain in the simplest possible way the problem with opensource components: I am going to use a metaphor that seems to resonate well with our customers, which however may not be necessarily accurate from an engineering point of view.

Building a house.

When you build a house a lot of work has to be done, starting from the planning all down to the actual building of the foundation, infrastructure, walls, ceilings, and roof. This work is different for every house and very specific so that it’s necessary to have a very solid process to make sure the standards of quality are high enough from a variety of point of views. There’s an enormous amount of attention on every aspect and it’s always supported by a strict set of practices and processes.

Now, when you build a house, there are a lot of things you do not necessarily want to create from scratch: items like windows and doors, for example, are components readily available on the market in a variety of shapes and sizes. You do not need to build them from scratch: that would require specific craftsmen and a sizeable amount of time. You simply shop for those components, find the right ones and integrate them into your house.

As we are a security company, let’s focus on security for a moment. Your team built the walls and the infrastructure, right? With a very strict process that guarantees you that everything is solid, unbreakable and durable. But what about windows and doors? You bought those components off the shelf: what do you know about their quality? Are the locks durable? Are the glasses really break proof or are they affected by some design flaw? How much of your house did you have to buy from other manufacturers? And how long ago was it? What’s the warranty, and did you stay warm this winter or were the windows drafty?

This is the problem with opensource components.

Building a software application.

In a modern development process, your development team is “building the house”: writing the code that contains the business logic of your application. They also need a lot of other code to do various ordinary tasks, like talking to a database, exposing an API, talking to other services, exchanging data using a machine-readable format like JSON or XML. The opensource community has already available off the shelf components you simply incorporate in the project, saving huge amounts of money and dramatically shortening the time to market: those are the “windows” and “doors”. Worse than in a building, however, off the shelf software components can be up to the 80% of the code shipped to production, making them a very critical asset to keep under control.

What we are finding when we meet potential customers is that they have a very strict process with regards to their code, often supported by a variety of tools in order to make sure that the business logic code is solid and secure. The same attention, however, is not extended to the opensource components used, which are simply bundled with the code shipped to production.

The opensource components are like the “doors” and the “windows” of your “house”: are they secure? Every day an average of 40 new vulnerabilities are discovered in external components, and new versions of those are often released monthly. It’s critical to keep the components used in your applications up to date and replace them immediately, to avoid something like what happened to Equifax, that simply did not update a vulnerable software component, Apache Struts.

graph-2(source: vulndb)

Do you know how much of your base is opensource? Do you know when you updated it last? And do you know every noteworthy detail of the updates from those external components?

What can you do?

Our software, Meterian, does exactly that job. It will continuously check the opensource components used by your business logic so that you will not have any nasty surprises because of them. It takes 5 minutes to set it up in your process, and you can also simply run it on your codebase with no installation at all. You do not need to be a developer to run it and it produces also a clear report that is understandable and actionable right away.

We strongly encourage you to give it a try, or maybe just have a look at our reports for some common libraries like Alibaba/FastJson or Netflix/Zuul, both scoring a resounding 0 in security at the time of writing.

Keep your house safe, keep all external components under control.

The problem with opensource components

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